Mentor United Methodist Church

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Gingerbread House Craft Show

The Gingerbread House Craft Show is a United Methodist Women event.

 
Thank you to everyone who helped make the 2019 show a success!  See you next year!

Please contact gingerbread@mentorumc.org with any questions or to inquire about participation.  All crafter correspondence is directed to this email.
Click HERE to view the website for the Gingerbread House Craft Show. 

Craft Show History
When Mentor Methodist’s “new” church building was completed in 1906, the Ladies’ Aid Society, as it was then called, organized its first bazaar, at which craft items, vegetables, candy, and other foods were sold. This forerunner of the current Gingerbread House continued through the 1920’s, when the Model T replaced the previously used horse and buggy as a means of bringing workers and shoppers to festivals.

The Fall Festival, as it was then known, gained more space with the addition of the Education Wing, and at various times has included sales areas featuring plants, children’s clothing, books, attic treasures, a special quilt made by the Quilters, a Christmas workshop, lunch and tea rooms, a hot dog stand, and for a short time, antiques.

Workshops to prepare for the bazaar were held once or twice a week for several months beforehand, and this continues today. At one time a meal was served the night before the bazaar, but that was dropped in favor of lighter fare served on the day of the sale….

Caramel making once played a big part in preparation for the bazaar. That was a twice-a-week affair, lasting for a month or six weeks. Up to 500 pounds of caramels were made during that time. A few of the men helped to cut the candy, and the older ladies wrapped it. One husband made a carpeted platform for the women to stand on during the 2-3 hour task of stirring the sticky concoction.

In 1972 the Fall Festival acquired a new name—the Gingerbread House. That same year crafts from the community were accepted on consignment. Many local people continue to bring their crafts year after year to what has become one of the most popular shows in the area.

Although the Gingerbread House and its predecessors have netted many thousands of dollars, one of its most important functions is the Christian fellowship and camaraderie it has fostered among the women of the church.

Taken from MUMC’s “Memories” published in 1988.